DERMATOLOGICAL

Papillomas


Papillomas are benign skin lumps.
Many called them moles and they are small, round, with stalk waves on the skin.
Papilloma usually has the color of the skin.
Papillomas may also be rosy, brown or even dark.
In the latter case, papilloma look like common warts (moles).

Papillomas are something most people have after the age of 25-30.
Papillomas are due to HPV viruses, i.e. viruses that cause warts and genital warts.
However, papillomas are not equally infectious. i.e. not easily transmitted from person to person.

Papilloma can multiply and spread in the same person after rubbing or traumatisation of the area.
The main HPV viruses responsible for causing warts are HPV 6 and HPV 11. They are basically low-risk viruses.

Therefore, papillomas are not particularly associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, although in rare cases malformation and skin cancer is noted over a papilloma.

The "moles" as commonly called by people or skin papillomas as defined in medicine, are small protuberances of the skin resembling nevi (olives) and are typically found in the neck, armpits, and the region below the breast or a bra in women.
Skin papillomas are a frequent phenomenon in almost all ages.
They are small lumps that have the color of the skin and promote the skin or having a wide basis or via a short stalk.
Some types of papilloma do not require treatment and usually self-heal. The remaining are amenable to treatment according to the position they are found, their size and their specific subtype.

• Brain, breast or respiratory papillomas are treated by surgical removal.
• Skin and genital papillomas (warts) are treated with topical preparations or mechanically eliminated with cryotherapy, surgical removal, radio frequency (RF) or Laser.

The most modern and appropriate way to eliminate these persistent and annoying skin lesions is their mechanical removal and burn using radio frequency (RF).

This technique is achieved by a destruction of the lesions with simultaneous prevention of thermal injury of the surrounding healthy tissue.